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The story did hold my attention until Beheim's descent into a hell-like dimension in search of The Patriarch, the mysterious creature in charge of Castle Banat.

Things just got so incoherent there that I lost interest in the novel. Beheim does catch the crook and it's no one you would expect it to be. But at that point, I no longer cared.

Shepard writes well enough that I'd definitely give him another chance, though. He writes in a lot of different sub-genres of fantasy.

I'm hoping that he did better in another of his novels. Lucius Shepard's "Green Eyes" gave us the first Lacanian faux-zombie existential romance a wonderful and wonderfully different kind of zombie tale.

There is something of "Anno Dracula" and "Empire of Fear" here the vampire society and its own culture and rituals as well as Peake's Gormenghast or any number of Gothick romances, with the characters encased in a surreal building ca Lucius Shepard's "Green Eyes" gave us the first Lacanian faux-zombie existential romance a wonderful and wonderfully different kind of zombie tale.

There is something of "Anno Dracula" and "Empire of Fear" here the vampire society and its own culture and rituals as well as Peake's Gormenghast or any number of Gothick romances, with the characters encased in a surreal building castle, manor house, Library of Babel So, then a vampire murder mystery, complete with ex-police detective vampire and a host of suspects and diversionary clues and subplots.

Shepard allows the dialogue to become a bit stilted and tries unsuccessfully to expand the world he's creating past its initial Poirot-amidst-vampires ideas.

Still, though, not a bad read. Worth a winter's night. The Golden is a murder mystery, but one with a unique premise and an emphasis on the relationships and power struggles played out between vampires in the course of the investigation.

It's a good story; it just happens to have vampires as the characters. Nov 11, Outis rated it really liked it Shelves: Garish, brillant, ludicrous, insane.

The reviews aren't conveying how crazy half of this nightmare of a book is. The other half has a logical plot and they didn't always mix too well, as if the shiny parody of a fallen god had read the numinous recipe for a black swan curry backwards.

The first flowery chapters of The Golden are deceptive. Except for some details, it didn't seem it was a Shepard. Oh but it was! The hero was all angsty about his relationship with the Weird.

The hero was all angsty about his relationship with the adoring victim he seduced into enacting an overly literal metaphor of stereotypical gender roles.

I've never read Twilight but I was concerned for a moment it was going to mine that same vein. My lack of faith is disturbing, isn't it?

It soon became clear the setting was a dreamworld and the monsters started showing their ugly side. By the way of a WARNING, shortly before being double-kneecapped with a blunt weapon, one of them even volunteered a description of how he raped a child, something even authors who are trying to be edgy often shy away from.

One of the good thins about The Golden is the unusally convincing portrayal of ridiculously powerful and immortal sociopaths.

Shepard shows and his characters tell. The hypocritical rants are pretty decent actually. Prepare from some predictable Christian-bashing though.

The interminable psychological struggle of the angsty hero who needs to come to terms with who he has become is also well done, considering. There might be too much monologue for some tastes but it does tie in with the plot and the gory scenes.

The mystery aspect is competently done, with solid foreshadowing. The hero was a bit slow in piecing together the clues but that was the only way I was going to get the satisfaction of figuring it out a step or two ahead of him.

The transitions between these logical parts and the Lynchian dream sequences was sometimes jarring. And the transitions with the nightmare sequences more so.

But the mix of dream logic and action thriller isn't all bad. For one thing, it's easier to sell a ridiculous amount of fun twists in an all-out fantastical story.

If you don't know how Shepard writes, his showy style is often badly over the top. But it's evocative or at least intriguing. In this book, I got annyoned by the overuse of a particular construction, as if the author got tired of a more pedestrian word which was to be oversued in social media as well.

He probably did it on purpose. I can't shake the impression that the book was littered with literary references I didn't get. But then I don't particularly care.

This is no small feat! I'm mentionning this in the spoilery section because it's clever enough that for much of the book, it's not clear it's a romance.

I also enjoyed the way some popular metaphors are given a literal twist. Nov 15, Glen Engel-Cox rated it it was ok Shelves: This is also well worth reading if you are a Shepard fan.

Although I had already purchased it, his recommendation proved the goad to read it. May 11, Meganm rated it really liked it. Very strange book, but extremely well written and incredibly interesting.

It was recommended to me by a friend and I'm glad I read it. It started off a bit slow. It reminded me of The Picture of Dorian Gray as far as style and dialogue.

At first, there didn't seem to be anything vampiric about it at all other than the characters being vampires, obviously , but as it progressed, it was dark and haunting.

I liked the philosophies presented and I think I will pick up a few more of Shepard's novels Very strange book, but extremely well written and incredibly interesting.

I liked the philosophies presented and I think I will pick up a few more of Shepard's novels. I liked his writing a lot. There were many parts of the books that stayed with me because of how eloquently written they were.

Jun 16, Barbora rated it it was ok Shelves: I have the exact same feeling I had after reading Green Eyes. A good idea, but poorly executed.

Like what the hell was all that metaphysical stuff? And the characters were flat as a pancake. I am not sure why, or how I finished this.

Jan 31, Rea rated it it was amazing Shelves: Decadence, sweet decadence, thy stench permeates the pages of this book.

I still haven't found one. I won't recap the story, because the synopsis is sufficient for that. The book is full of purple prose.

Where Bram Stoker and Anne Rice wrote beautiful, flowing prose, this book just tries too hard in my opinion.

The descriptions of everything are too grandiose and try to weave in stream of consciousness, but the stream is so disjointed that it I have been seeking a really great vampire novel since I read Dracula by Bram Stoker and The Vampire Chronicles by Anne Rice.

The descriptions of everything are too grandiose and try to weave in stream of consciousness, but the stream is so disjointed that it just ends up sounding like a desperate attempt at sounding cool.

But that's just my opinion. Reading is so subjective. There are a lot of reviews giving this book 5 stars and singing the praises of the author's prose.

But you be the judge. Here is a passage where the protagonist, Beheim, has just had an ugly encounter with another vampire, Kostolec.

This is the description of Kostolec's exit after their verbal altercation: The rays of lantern light had grown sharply defined, blades of radiance that spread to touch the ranks of books and folios on the opposite wall, and as they brightened further Kostolec himself began to darken, his flesh and his clothing losing detail and color as if he had fallen under a deep shadow, until at last the light dimmed to its normal brilliance, and what stood by the railing beneath it had itself become no more than a a shadow, a figure of absolute, unfractionated black.

This absence of a man stood without moving, but within a matter of seconds, the figure flew apart into paper-looking scraps of black vitality, like bats and ashes, and these remnants fluttered off into the darkness; then, like a seam of gleaming anthracite exposed in midair, a shiny surface manifested at the center of the well, seeming to pour both upward and downward, to be measuring in reflection the passage of a light in motion.

That passage also reminds me of another problem I have with this book. While the author launches into long-winded descriptions of some things, he doesn't give us information about others.

For example, looking the above excerpt, no other vampire in the book can fade into these bat-like scraps and just disappear.

At least you don't think they can because nobody else ever does, and there are several times when various vampires are in situations where they need to escape and this would be a good way to do it, but they don't.

So apparently, no one else can. And we never know why Kostolec can. Another complaint I have about this book is that I never liked or had any sympathy for any of the characters.

Anne Rice built her characters to the point where you loved them, liked them, were shocked by them, or all of the above.

Lastly, for most of the book, I found it easy to leave it frequently and go do something else. When I love a book, I am lost in it.

I am teleported into the story. I've never scuba dived, but surfacing from a book I am loving is like what I imagine surfacing from the depths of the ocean is like.

As I imagine that would feel, I am momentarily disoriented and disappointed. I didn't feel that with this book.

I gave it 3 stars, though, because the story was good enough that I finished it, and in fact, the last few chapters were suspenseful and captivating.

I always feel some trepidation when reading my second work by an author after I liked the first, and that trepidation was magnified here: I liked Shepard's Life During Wartime enough to try it, though, and it quickly becomes apparent that, despite the blurb, this isn't a work that would belong in a grocery store check-out line, or even I always feel some trepidation when reading my second work by an author after I liked the first, and that trepidation was magnified here: I liked Shepard's Life During Wartime enough to try it, though, and it quickly becomes apparent that, despite the blurb, this isn't a work that would belong in a grocery store check-out line, or even the romance section of a bookstore.

A similar form of the phrase appeared in a Catholic catechism around certainly in the reprint of Love foreigners as you love yourselves, because you were foreigners one time in Egypt.

I am the Lord your God. Two passages in the New Testament quote Jesus of Nazareth espousing the positive form of the Golden rule:. Do to others what you want them to do to you.

This is the meaning of the law of Moses and the teaching of the prophets. A similar passage, a parallel to the Great Commandment , is Luke Love him with all your strength and with all your mind.

The passage in the book of Luke then continues with Jesus answering the question, "Who is my neighbor? Jesus' teaching goes beyond the negative formulation of not doing what one would not like done to themselves, to the positive formulation of actively doing good to another that, if the situations were reversed, one would desire that the other would do for them.

This formulation, as indicated in the parable of the Good Samaritan, emphasizes the needs for positive action that brings benefit to another, not simply restraining oneself from negative activities that hurt another.

Taken as a rule of judgment, both formulations of the golden rule, the negative and positive, are equally applicable.

In one passage of the New Testament , Paul the Apostle refers to the golden rule:. The Arabian peninsula was known to not practice the golden rule prior to the advent of Islam.

Fakir al-Din al-Razi and several other Qur'anic commentators have pointed out that Qur'an Similar examples of the golden rule are found in the hadith of the prophet Muhammad.

The hadith recount what the prophet is believed to have said and done, and traditionally Muslims regard the hadith as second to only the Qur'an as a guide to correct belief and action.

From the hadith , the collected oral and written accounts of Muhammad and his teachings during his lifetime:. A Bedouin came to the prophet, grabbed the stirrup of his camel and said: O the messenger of God!

Teach me something to go to heaven with it. Now let the stirrup go! That which you want for yourself, seek for mankind.

The most righteous person is the one who consents for other people what he consents for himself, and who dislikes for them what he dislikes for himself.

O' my child, make yourself the measure for dealings between you and others. Thus, you should desire for others what you desire for yourself and hate for others what you hate for yourself.

Do not oppress as you do not like to be oppressed. Do good to others as you would like good to be done to you. Regard bad for yourself whatever you regard bad for others.

Accept that treatment from others which you would like others to accept from you Do not say to others what you do not like to be said to you. Deny not My servant should he ask anything from thee, for his face is My face; be then abashed before Me.

And if thine eyes be turned towards justice, choose thou for thy neighbour that which thou choosest for thyself. Ascribe not to any soul that which thou wouldst not have ascribed to thee, and say not that which thou doest not.

This, in brief, is the rule of dharma. Other behavior is due to selfish desires. By making dharma your main focus, treat others as you treat yourself [48].

If the entire Dharma can be said in a few words, then it is—that which is unfavorable to us, do not do that to others. Buddha Siddhartha Gautama, c.

It occurs in many places and in many forms throughout the Tripitaka. Comparing oneself to others in such terms as "Just as I am so are they, just as they are so am I," he should neither kill nor cause others to kill.

One who, while himself seeking happiness, oppresses with violence other beings who also desire happiness, will not attain happiness hereafter. Putting oneself in the place of another, one should not kill nor cause another to kill.

The Golden Rule is paramount in the Jainist philosophy and can be seen in the doctrines of Ahimsa and Karma. As part of the prohibition of causing any living beings to suffer, Jainism forbids inflicting upon others what is harmful to oneself.

The following quotation from the Acaranga Sutra sums up the philosophy of Jainism:. Nothing which breathes, which exists, which lives, or which has essence or potential of life, should be destroyed or ruled over, or subjugated, or harmed, or denied of its essence or potential.

In support of this Truth, I ask you a question — "Is sorrow or pain desirable to you? If you say, "No, It is not" you will be expressing the truth.

Just as sorrow or pain is not desirable to you, so it is to all which breathe, exist, live or have any essence of life.

To you and all, it is undesirable, and painful, and repugnant. In happiness and suffering, in joy and grief, we should regard all creatures as we regard our own self.

Saman Suttam of Jinendra Varni [53] gives further insight into this precept: Just as pain is not agreeable to you, it is so with others.

Knowing this principle of equality treat other with respect and compassion. Killing a living being is killing one's own self; showing compassion to a living being is showing compassion to oneself.

He who desires his own good, should avoid causing any harm to a living being. Precious like jewels are the minds of all.

To hurt them is not at all good. If thou desirest thy Beloved, then hurt thou not anyone's heart. The same idea is also presented in V. The phraseology differs from the Christian version of the Golden Rule.

It does not presume to do anything unto others, but merely to avoid doing what would be harmful. It does not preclude doing good deeds and taking moral positions, but there is slim possibility for a Confucian missionary outlook, such as one can justify with the Christian Golden Rule.

The sage has no interest of his own, but takes the interests of the people as his own. He is kind to the kind; he is also kind to the unkind: He is faithful to the faithful; he is also faithful to the unfaithful: For one would do for others as one would do for oneself.

And so if states and cities do not attack one another and families do not wreak havoc upon and steal from one another, would this be a harm to the world or a benefit?

Of course one must say it is a benefit to the world. Mozi regarded the golden rule as a corollary to the cardinal virtue of impartiality, and encouraged egalitarianism and selflessness in relationships.

Here ye these words and heed them well, the words of Dea, thy Mother Goddess , "I command thee thus, O children of the Earth, that that which ye deem harmful unto thyself, the very same shall ye be forbidden from doing unto another, for violence and hatred give rise to the same.

My command is thus, that ye shall return all violence and hatred with peacefulness and love, for my Law is love unto all things.

Only through love shall ye have peace; yea and verily, only peace and love will cure the world, and subdue all evil. One who is going to take a pointed stick to pinch a baby bird should first try it on himself to feel how it hurts.

Nke si ibe ya ebene gosi ya ebe o ga-ebe. Whoever says the other shall not perch, may they show the other where to perch.

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The golden -

Neben der rituellen Arbeit wurde nur theoretisches Grundlagenwissen über die Kabbala , Astrologie , Tarot und Alchemie vermittelt. Sie haben sich angemeldet und erhalten in Kürze eine Willkommens-E-Mail. Richtlinien Richtlinien für Haustiere Stornierungsrichtlinien Richtlinien für Paare sind nicht-verheiratete Personen gestattet? In der ersten Stufe färben sich die sichtbaren Adern der Betroffenen blau, wie es bei Tequila der Fall war, der Drogendealern auf der Spur war und daher in Kontakt mit diesen Drogen kam. The room was spacious and the bed comfortable and large.

The Golden Video

THANK YOU FOR 150K SUBSCRIBERS!! Diese Webseite verwendet Cookies. Informationen zum Mittag- und Abendessen Preise der Mahlzeiten. Die Gemeinschaftstoiletten waren nicht sehr sauber und die Paysafecard wo bezahlen riecht muffig. In der ersten Stufe färben sich die sichtbaren Adern der Betroffenen blau, wie es bei Tequila diamond casino Fall war, der Drogendealern auf der Spur war und daher in Kontakt mit diesen Drogen kam. Liegt nicht zentral in einem Ort, aber für uns war das genau richtig. The first flowery chapters of The Golden are deceptive. The hero was all angsty about his relationship with the Weird. At least you don't think they can Beste Spielothek in Achern finden nobody else ever does, and there are several times when various vampires are in situations where they need to escape and this would be a good way to do it, but they don't. Taking a shot basically, which can offend those of the Mega casino bonus codes faith. The Way to Happiness: They are there for The Decanting, a ceremony in which a chosen few will drink the blood of The Golden, a virgin specially bred to produce an intoxicating, monte carlo casino online vintage. The common English phrasing is "Do unto others as you would have them do unto you". From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. I expect most people will not like it, finding sizzling hot deluxe mybet to be overwritten and too obsessed with descriptions: And Beste Spielothek in Aschtal finden characters were flat Beste Spielothek in Kaminshof finden a pancake. See also Talmud Yerushalmi, Nedarim 9: Another complaint I have about this book is that I never liked or had any sympathy for any of the characters. Paden, the Golden Rule is arguably the most essential basis for the modern concept of human rightsin which each individual has a right to online slot kostenlos treatment, and a reciprocal responsibility to ensure justice for others. However, when the Golden is discovered murdered one evening, it falls on newly converted vampire Beheim, who was previously a police inspector, to seek out the culprit.

Mobilized by the news Deviating from traditional tales that feature lonely vampires who prowl through human society in search of victims or solace, this account of vampires flourishing in their own "inhuman society" takes place in the year , when their centuries-long breeding experiments have finally produced "The Golden," a mortal whose blood is perfect and powerful.

Mobilized by the news of this discovery, aristocratic vampire clans arrive at the looming Castle Banat, where they plan to partake of the sublime blood.

To their shock, the guests find that The Golden, a young girl, has been brutally murdered and her blood already drained. The story also follows the Inspector Michael Beheim—a recent vampire—assigned to track down the killer.

Recounted in full 19th-century literary style with gothic elements and foreshadowing, the inspector navigates his way through the vampire world and the crime therein.

Paperback , pages. Published April 1st by Golden Gryphon Press first published Locus Award for Best Horror Novel To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

To ask other readers questions about The Golden , please sign up. See 1 question about The Golden…. Lists with This Book. Oct 21, mark monday rated it really liked it Shelves: View all 8 comments.

May 19, Maria Clara rated it liked it. Aug 01, Adam rated it it was amazing Shelves: Anyways I believe this book is different from probably most anything in that school, as it is on one level such a parade of delirious, freakish imagery that if this was written in late 19th or early 20th century by some French guy we would all be drooling over its small print reissue by Daedelus or Exact Change.

Pulpy and literary in equal strides. Lots explicit sex and gore alongside a dearth of loveable characters may make this a bit of niche book.

Oct 08, Charles Dee Mitchell rated it really liked it Shelves: In the vampire elite gathers at Castle Banat, deep in the Carpathian mountains.

They are there for The Decanting, a ceremony in which a chosen few will drink the blood of The Golden, a virgin specially bred to produce an intoxicating, subtle vintage.

OK, this sound like the setup for a 's Eurotrash horror film, but Shepard's tale is in my limited reading the best vampire novel since Dracula.

His vampires are the traditional variety susceptible to sunlight, fire, and wooden stakes, but th In the vampire elite gathers at Castle Banat, deep in the Carpathian mountains.

His vampires are the traditional variety susceptible to sunlight, fire, and wooden stakes, but the society he creates for them is complex, grotesques, and always entertaining.

When The Golden is found murdered, drained of blood and savagely mauled, Michel Beheim, a vampire that was once the Parisian Chief of Police, is put on the case.

One of the many genres Shepard plays with is the conventional English country house mystery, although Castle Banat is an architectural marvel that makes Gormenghast seem like a weekend getaway.

It is a multi-story, multi-dimensional edifice that accomodates not only The Patriarch and the convocation of vampires, but over the centuries has become the home of a society of those who once served vampires but never made the cut to become full-fledged members of the family.

These debased beings live like rats in the walls, but as is often the case with servants, they know more about what's going on than do their masters.

Beheim's junior status among the aristocratic vampires also makes The Golden a coming-of-age novel. As Beheim is warned early on, he has much to learn.

Shepard's language is a balancing act of realistic narrative and purple prose. The vampires engage in decadent, sophisticated banter that is part Noel Coward and part Marquis de Sade.

The violent passages are graphic and it turns out that vampires like to have a lot of sex, both with one another and their servants. Shepard writes excellent prolonged sex scenes that might be laughable if looked at a second time but fit neatly into his story.

Shepard reels off similes, metaphors, and over-the-top descriptions that seldom flag or weigh down the narrative.

The only passage that falls flat is Beheim's trip into The Mysteries, an episode that reads like a ride through a carnival spook house, although admittedly one with excellent special effects.

Beheim endures a very long night packed with incidents that are at times erotic, suspenseful, repulsive, or majestic. By its conclusion readers find themselves, like its hero, shaken, disheveled, and dealing with a world that has been irremediably transformed.

Lucius Shepard is a very gifted writer. His baroque descriptions of the labyrinthine grotesqueries of the huge vampire stronghold in Carpathia, Castle Banat, are worth the price of admission.

He's kind of the Hieronymous Bosch of fantasy writing I mean the bizarre medieval painter, not Michael Connolly's detective who's named after him.

I could live with his often purple prose. The first problem was the characters. I never really understood or empathized with the main characters.

There is Michel Beheim, the former Paris policeman turned vampire. He's courageous, ethical, and a thorough investigator, but I had trouble caring about him.

He's supposed to have a conscience, and he does, until his vampire instincts take over. There's Alexandra, his beautiful vampire lover. I found her inscrutable and unsympathetic.

Then there is the dialogue. I'm guessing Shepard was going for a formality suggesting aristocrats in an indeterminate time in the past.

But most of it just came off as stilted and unrealistic. The story involved Beheim in a murder investigation. A beautiful human girl, the Golden, is bred especially for the complexity and appeal of her blood.

There is to be a ceremony called a "Decanting" in which she is turned into a vampire. However, her brutally murdered corpse is found in Castle Banat before the Decanting ceremony.

Beheim is charged with finding the murderer. The story did hold my attention until Beheim's descent into a hell-like dimension in search of The Patriarch, the mysterious creature in charge of Castle Banat.

Things just got so incoherent there that I lost interest in the novel. Beheim does catch the crook and it's no one you would expect it to be.

But at that point, I no longer cared. Shepard writes well enough that I'd definitely give him another chance, though.

He writes in a lot of different sub-genres of fantasy. I'm hoping that he did better in another of his novels. Lucius Shepard's "Green Eyes" gave us the first Lacanian faux-zombie existential romance a wonderful and wonderfully different kind of zombie tale.

There is something of "Anno Dracula" and "Empire of Fear" here the vampire society and its own culture and rituals as well as Peake's Gormenghast or any number of Gothick romances, with the characters encased in a surreal building ca Lucius Shepard's "Green Eyes" gave us the first Lacanian faux-zombie existential romance a wonderful and wonderfully different kind of zombie tale.

There is something of "Anno Dracula" and "Empire of Fear" here the vampire society and its own culture and rituals as well as Peake's Gormenghast or any number of Gothick romances, with the characters encased in a surreal building castle, manor house, Library of Babel So, then a vampire murder mystery, complete with ex-police detective vampire and a host of suspects and diversionary clues and subplots.

Shepard allows the dialogue to become a bit stilted and tries unsuccessfully to expand the world he's creating past its initial Poirot-amidst-vampires ideas.

Still, though, not a bad read. Worth a winter's night. The Golden is a murder mystery, but one with a unique premise and an emphasis on the relationships and power struggles played out between vampires in the course of the investigation.

It's a good story; it just happens to have vampires as the characters. Nov 11, Outis rated it really liked it Shelves: Garish, brillant, ludicrous, insane.

The reviews aren't conveying how crazy half of this nightmare of a book is. The other half has a logical plot and they didn't always mix too well, as if the shiny parody of a fallen god had read the numinous recipe for a black swan curry backwards.

The first flowery chapters of The Golden are deceptive. Except for some details, it didn't seem it was a Shepard. Oh but it was!

The hero was all angsty about his relationship with the Weird. The hero was all angsty about his relationship with the adoring victim he seduced into enacting an overly literal metaphor of stereotypical gender roles.

I've never read Twilight but I was concerned for a moment it was going to mine that same vein. My lack of faith is disturbing, isn't it? It soon became clear the setting was a dreamworld and the monsters started showing their ugly side.

By the way of a WARNING, shortly before being double-kneecapped with a blunt weapon, one of them even volunteered a description of how he raped a child, something even authors who are trying to be edgy often shy away from.

One of the good thins about The Golden is the unusally convincing portrayal of ridiculously powerful and immortal sociopaths. Shepard shows and his characters tell.

The hypocritical rants are pretty decent actually. Prepare from some predictable Christian-bashing though. The interminable psychological struggle of the angsty hero who needs to come to terms with who he has become is also well done, considering.

There might be too much monologue for some tastes but it does tie in with the plot and the gory scenes.

The mystery aspect is competently done, with solid foreshadowing. The hero was a bit slow in piecing together the clues but that was the only way I was going to get the satisfaction of figuring it out a step or two ahead of him.

The transitions between these logical parts and the Lynchian dream sequences was sometimes jarring. And the transitions with the nightmare sequences more so.

But the mix of dream logic and action thriller isn't all bad. For one thing, it's easier to sell a ridiculous amount of fun twists in an all-out fantastical story.

If you don't know how Shepard writes, his showy style is often badly over the top. But it's evocative or at least intriguing. In this book, I got annyoned by the overuse of a particular construction, as if the author got tired of a more pedestrian word which was to be oversued in social media as well.

He probably did it on purpose. I can't shake the impression that the book was littered with literary references I didn't get.

But then I don't particularly care. This is no small feat! I'm mentionning this in the spoilery section because it's clever enough that for much of the book, it's not clear it's a romance.

I also enjoyed the way some popular metaphors are given a literal twist. Nov 15, Glen Engel-Cox rated it it was ok Shelves: This is also well worth reading if you are a Shepard fan.

Although I had already purchased it, his recommendation proved the goad to read it. May 11, Meganm rated it really liked it.

Very strange book, but extremely well written and incredibly interesting. It was recommended to me by a friend and I'm glad I read it.

It started off a bit slow. It reminded me of The Picture of Dorian Gray as far as style and dialogue. At first, there didn't seem to be anything vampiric about it at all other than the characters being vampires, obviously , but as it progressed, it was dark and haunting.

I liked the philosophies presented and I think I will pick up a few more of Shepard's novels Very strange book, but extremely well written and incredibly interesting.

I liked the philosophies presented and I think I will pick up a few more of Shepard's novels. I liked his writing a lot. There were many parts of the books that stayed with me because of how eloquently written they were.

Jun 16, Barbora rated it it was ok Shelves: I have the exact same feeling I had after reading Green Eyes.

A good idea, but poorly executed. Like what the hell was all that metaphysical stuff? And the characters were flat as a pancake. I am not sure why, or how I finished this.

Jan 31, Rea rated it it was amazing Shelves: Decadence, sweet decadence, thy stench permeates the pages of this book.

I still haven't found one. I won't recap the story, because the synopsis is sufficient for that.

The book is full of purple prose. Where Bram Stoker and Anne Rice wrote beautiful, flowing prose, this book just tries too hard in my opinion.

The descriptions of everything are too grandiose and try to weave in stream of consciousness, but the stream is so disjointed that it I have been seeking a really great vampire novel since I read Dracula by Bram Stoker and The Vampire Chronicles by Anne Rice.

The descriptions of everything are too grandiose and try to weave in stream of consciousness, but the stream is so disjointed that it just ends up sounding like a desperate attempt at sounding cool.

But that's just my opinion. Reading is so subjective. There are a lot of reviews giving this book 5 stars and singing the praises of the author's prose.

But you be the judge. Here is a passage where the protagonist, Beheim, has just had an ugly encounter with another vampire, Kostolec.

This is the description of Kostolec's exit after their verbal altercation: The rays of lantern light had grown sharply defined, blades of radiance that spread to touch the ranks of books and folios on the opposite wall, and as they brightened further Kostolec himself began to darken, his flesh and his clothing losing detail and color as if he had fallen under a deep shadow, until at last the light dimmed to its normal brilliance, and what stood by the railing beneath it had itself become no more than a a shadow, a figure of absolute, unfractionated black.

This absence of a man stood without moving, but within a matter of seconds, the figure flew apart into paper-looking scraps of black vitality, like bats and ashes, and these remnants fluttered off into the darkness; then, like a seam of gleaming anthracite exposed in midair, a shiny surface manifested at the center of the well, seeming to pour both upward and downward, to be measuring in reflection the passage of a light in motion.

That passage also reminds me of another problem I have with this book. While the author launches into long-winded descriptions of some things, he doesn't give us information about others.

For example, looking the above excerpt, no other vampire in the book can fade into these bat-like scraps and just disappear.

At least you don't think they can because nobody else ever does, and there are several times when various vampires are in situations where they need to escape and this would be a good way to do it, but they don't.

So apparently, no one else can. And we never know why Kostolec can. Another complaint I have about this book is that I never liked or had any sympathy for any of the characters.

Anne Rice built her characters to the point where you loved them, liked them, were shocked by them, or all of the above. Lastly, for most of the book, I found it easy to leave it frequently and go do something else.

When I love a book, I am lost in it. I am teleported into the story. I've never scuba dived, but surfacing from a book I am loving is like what I imagine surfacing from the depths of the ocean is like.

The Golden Rule is the principle of treating others as one's self would wish to be treated. It is a maxim that is found in many religions and cultures.

The Golden Rule can be considered an ethic of reciprocity in some religions , although other religions treat it differently.

The maxim may appear as either a positive or negative injunction governing conduct:. The idea dates at least to the early Confucian times — BCE according to Rushworth Kidder , who identifies that this concept appears prominently in Buddhism , Christianity , Hinduism , Judaism , Taoism , Zoroastrianism , and "the rest of the world's major religions".

Yet, as with any historically prominent maxim, the Golden Rule is not without its controversy as seen in the Criticism section below.

The term "Golden Rule", or "Golden law", began to be used widely in the early 17th century in Britain by Anglican theologians and preachers; [8] the earliest known usage is that of Anglicans Charles Gibbon and Thomas Jackson in Possibly the earliest affirmation of the maxim of reciprocity, reflecting the ancient Egyptian goddess Ma'at , appears in the story of The Eloquent Peasant , which dates to the Middle Kingdom c.

Do to the doer to make him do. Listening to wise scriptures, austerity, sacrifice, respectful faith, social welfare, forgiveness, purity of intent, compassion, truth and self-control—are the ten wealth of character self.

O king aim for these, may you be steadfast in these qualities. These are the basis of prosperity and rightful living.

These are highest attainable things. All worlds are balanced on dharma , dharma encompasses ways to prosperity as well. Hence, keeping these in mind , by self-control and by making dharma right conduct your main focus, treat others as you treat yourself.

He furthermore opined that it is the determination of the spotless virtuous not to do evil, even in return, to those who have cherished enmity and done them evil.

The Golden Rule in its prohibitive negative form was a common principle in ancient Greek philosophy. Examples of the general concept include:.

The Pahlavi Texts of Zoroastrianism c. Seneca the Younger c. According to Simon Blackburn , the Golden Rule "can be found in some form in almost every ethical tradition".

A rule of altruistic reciprocity was first stated positively in a well-known Torah verse Hebrew: You shall not take vengeance or bear a grudge against your kinsfolk.

Love your neighbor as yourself: I am the LORD. Hillel the Elder c. Once, he was challenged by a gentile who asked to be converted under the condition that the Torah be explained to him while he stood on one foot.

Hillel accepted him as a candidate for conversion to Judaism but, drawing on Leviticus What is hateful to you, do not do to your fellow: Hillel recognized brotherly love as the fundamental principle of Jewish ethics.

This is echoed in the modern preamble of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Why was only a single specimen of man created first? To teach us that he who destroys a single soul destroys a whole world and that he who saves a single soul saves a whole world; furthermore, so no race or class may claim a nobler ancestry, saying, 'Our father was born first'; and, finally, to give testimony to the greatness of the Lord, who caused the wonderful diversity of mankind to emanate from one type.

And why was Adam created last of all beings? To teach him humility; for if he be overbearing, let him remember that the little fly preceded him in the order of creation.

The Jewish Publication Society's edition of Leviticus states:. Thou shalt not hate thy brother. This Torah verse represents one of several versions of the Golden Rule , which itself appears in various forms, positive and negative.

It is the earliest written version of that concept in a positive form. At the turn of the eras, the Jewish rabbis were discussing the scope of the meaning of Leviticus The stranger who resides with you shall be to you as one of your citizens; you shall love him as yourself, for you were strangers in the land of Egypt: On the verse, "Love your fellow as yourself," the classic commentator Rashi quotes from Torat Kohanim, an early Midrashic text regarding the famous dictum of Rabbi Akiva: Israel's postal service quoted from the previous Leviticus verse when it commemorated the Universal Declaration of Human Rights on a postage stamp.

The common English phrasing is "Do unto others as you would have them do unto you". A similar form of the phrase appeared in a Catholic catechism around certainly in the reprint of Love foreigners as you love yourselves, because you were foreigners one time in Egypt.

I am the Lord your God. Two passages in the New Testament quote Jesus of Nazareth espousing the positive form of the Golden rule:.

Do to others what you want them to do to you. This is the meaning of the law of Moses and the teaching of the prophets.

A similar passage, a parallel to the Great Commandment , is Luke Love him with all your strength and with all your mind.

The passage in the book of Luke then continues with Jesus answering the question, "Who is my neighbor? Jesus' teaching goes beyond the negative formulation of not doing what one would not like done to themselves, to the positive formulation of actively doing good to another that, if the situations were reversed, one would desire that the other would do for them.

This formulation, as indicated in the parable of the Good Samaritan, emphasizes the needs for positive action that brings benefit to another, not simply restraining oneself from negative activities that hurt another.

Taken as a rule of judgment, both formulations of the golden rule, the negative and positive, are equally applicable.

In one passage of the New Testament , Paul the Apostle refers to the golden rule:. The Arabian peninsula was known to not practice the golden rule prior to the advent of Islam.

Fakir al-Din al-Razi and several other Qur'anic commentators have pointed out that Qur'an Similar examples of the golden rule are found in the hadith of the prophet Muhammad.

The hadith recount what the prophet is believed to have said and done, and traditionally Muslims regard the hadith as second to only the Qur'an as a guide to correct belief and action.

From the hadith , the collected oral and written accounts of Muhammad and his teachings during his lifetime:. A Bedouin came to the prophet, grabbed the stirrup of his camel and said: O the messenger of God!

Teach me something to go to heaven with it. Now let the stirrup go! That which you want for yourself, seek for mankind. The most righteous person is the one who consents for other people what he consents for himself, and who dislikes for them what he dislikes for himself.

O' my child, make yourself the measure for dealings between you and others. Thus, you should desire for others what you desire for yourself and hate for others what you hate for yourself.

Do not oppress as you do not like to be oppressed. Do good to others as you would like good to be done to you.

Regard bad for yourself whatever you regard bad for others. Accept that treatment from others which you would like others to accept from you Do not say to others what you do not like to be said to you.

Deny not My servant should he ask anything from thee, for his face is My face; be then abashed before Me.

And if thine eyes be turned towards justice, choose thou for thy neighbour that which thou choosest for thyself. Ascribe not to any soul that which thou wouldst not have ascribed to thee, and say not that which thou doest not.

This, in brief, is the rule of dharma. Other behavior is due to selfish desires. By making dharma your main focus, treat others as you treat yourself [48].

If the entire Dharma can be said in a few words, then it is—that which is unfavorable to us, do not do that to others.

Buddha Siddhartha Gautama, c. It occurs in many places and in many forms throughout the Tripitaka. Comparing oneself to others in such terms as "Just as I am so are they, just as they are so am I," he should neither kill nor cause others to kill.

One who, while himself seeking happiness, oppresses with violence other beings who also desire happiness, will not attain happiness hereafter.

Putting oneself in the place of another, one should not kill nor cause another to kill. The Golden Rule is paramount in the Jainist philosophy and can be seen in the doctrines of Ahimsa and Karma.

As part of the prohibition of causing any living beings to suffer, Jainism forbids inflicting upon others what is harmful to oneself.

The following quotation from the Acaranga Sutra sums up the philosophy of Jainism:. Nothing which breathes, which exists, which lives, or which has essence or potential of life, should be destroyed or ruled over, or subjugated, or harmed, or denied of its essence or potential.

In support of this Truth, I ask you a question — "Is sorrow or pain desirable to you? If you say, "No, It is not" you will be expressing the truth.

Just as sorrow or pain is not desirable to you, so it is to all which breathe, exist, live or have any essence of life.

To you and all, it is undesirable, and painful, and repugnant. In happiness and suffering, in joy and grief, we should regard all creatures as we regard our own self.

Saman Suttam of Jinendra Varni [53] gives further insight into this precept: Just as pain is not agreeable to you, it is so with others.

Knowing this principle of equality treat other with respect and compassion. Killing a living being is killing one's own self; showing compassion to a living being is showing compassion to oneself.

He who desires his own good, should avoid causing any harm to a living being. Precious like jewels are the minds of all.

To hurt them is not at all good. If thou desirest thy Beloved, then hurt thou not anyone's heart. The same idea is also presented in V.

The phraseology differs from the Christian version of the Golden Rule. It does not presume to do anything unto others, but merely to avoid doing what would be harmful.

It does not preclude doing good deeds and taking moral positions, but there is slim possibility for a Confucian missionary outlook, such as one can justify with the Christian Golden Rule.

The sage has no interest of his own, but takes the interests of the people as his own. He is kind to the kind; he is also kind to the unkind: He is faithful to the faithful; he is also faithful to the unfaithful: For one would do for others as one would do for oneself.

And so if states and cities do not attack one another and families do not wreak havoc upon and steal from one another, would this be a harm to the world or a benefit?

Of course one must say it is a benefit to the world. Mozi regarded the golden rule as a corollary to the cardinal virtue of impartiality, and encouraged egalitarianism and selflessness in relationships.

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